Book Review – Girl, Stop Apologizing

***Possible Spoilers Ahead!***
*** Due to the fact that this is a non-fiction book, spoilers aren’t as huge of a factor. However, if you wish to read this with no previous insight, I recommend that you skip this review 🙂 **

Book Title: Girl, Stop Apologizing!
Author: Rachel Hollis
Main Theme: Self–Help/Self-love, Non-fiction
Thesis: “Girl, Stop Apologizing” is Hollis’ follow up book to “Girl, Wash Your Face”, published in 2018. While “Girl, Wash Your Face” was a more personal outlook on Hollis’ life, “Girl, Stop Apologizing” takes a deeper look into her business, and how Hollis started from the bottom, the hurdles she has faced with herself as the CEO of her own company, and where she is at now.

What Drew Me In: What can I say? I’m a Rachel Hollis fangirl now. I was so hesitant with “Girl, Wash Your Face”, but I end up falling in love with it. This book has given so much insight into what one of her conferences would be like. I have struggled more and more with my depression and anxiety lately because of some really stressful things happening in my life.  So, I figured that I would give her new book a try.  Plus, I bought it at Target with my Starbucks drink in my hand. You just can’t get any more “white girl” than that.

My Thoughts: Throughout her book, Rachel is so encouraging, inspiring, and uplifting to women who struggle with the daily woes of their lives, especially with the concept of achieving their goals or furthering their businesses. My favorite passage so far has been Chapter 4: I’m not enough to succeed.

It is like she wrote this chapter just for me.

I’ve struggled with this idea for a VERY long time. Ever since childhood, I’ve have thought, “I am not enough”. Not good enough to be a good daughter, or a friend, or a good sister. Not good enough to be a good enough student, to have good grades or be involved in all the after-school activities. I wallowed in my own self-pity for years, missing out on so much that life has to offer, because I settled with the idea of “I’m not good enough, so why bother?”

I’m going to pull a little section from the book, an example that Rachel provided on how she felt like she wasn’t good enough. Please keep in mind that “Girl, Stop Apologizing” focuses more on the business aspect of her life, as she is intending on these chapters to be more focused on her business, I feel like I can relate to it on a personal level AND apply it to my current job.

“It pains me to admit this to you, but a couple of years into this process of building my company, I had barely looked at our books. They overwhelmed me, and I didn’t understand what I was looking at. So I hardly even glanced at the financial reports our accountant would run for us. As long as I had enough money to cover payroll and clients were paying their bills on time, I didn’t really pay attention. Truthfully, it wasn’t laziness or complacency that was driving this decision. It was fear. Every time I looked at a financial statment and didn’t understand it, that voice in my head – you know the one, that jerk version of yourself that likes to point out all your flaws – would list out all the things I was deeply worried about. You’re not smart enough to run a company at this level. Who do you thank you are? These people are trusting you with their livelihoods, and you can’t even read a balance sheet. You’re going to fail. This fear and this circle of self-recrimination went on for years, and then one day I just got sick of it.

Man, do I know what that little voice is that she is talking about. In fact, I struggled with it just the other day. I was sitting at work, minding my own business, working on some Interlibrary Loans (these are requests that my patrons ask for, and I can ask surrounding libraries if I can borrow their copy). In the back of my mind, I was feeling unsure of myself. I have been struggling with myself and the thought of how much I am worth at my job. You know that phrase, “Everyone is replaceable.”? I hate that phrase more than anything. Yes, if for some reason I decided to quit my job, or god forbid get fired, they would hire someone else to work the front desk. She (or he) would answer the phone, send and receive emails, answer patron’s questions about the Summer Reading program, or sign them up for library cards. Someone would take over the Interlibrary Loan process. They would get the requests, decide if they would try to purchase it or ask to borrow it from another library. They would deal with all the paperwork, pay the postage, and be held responsible for the borrowed item.

But you know what? They wouldn’t do it exactly like me.

I was given the duty for Interlibrary Loans on kind of a whim. I had no experience beforehand, and little training for it. I’ve been overwhelmed by the amount of paperwork, the number of requests (Over 100 requests in the last 3 months by the way), and the responsibility of it all. But man, I’m proud of what I have accomplished. It makes my heart so happy when my patrons get the book they were wanting. Whether it was a preparation book for an exam or an older book by their favorite author, I have helped them get the item into their hands. I’ve developed my own system on how I like to handle things; all the paperwork has its own folders to go into, the packaging is lined nice and neat in the desk. I have figured out how to run reports on what I’m looking for, to get the exact information that could be useful for me. I’m proud of myself, screw that little voice in my head!

And if you are wondering, Rachel decided to take an online business accounting program through Harvard Business School, which she openly admits that was a failure. It was expensive, and even though she got good grades and aced her tests, she felt like she had no greater knowledge of the concept of the financial side of her business than when she first started. So, she fell back to her roots. She did things that she knew could help her, like reading books or attending conferences and talking to real people, instead of typing away on her computer. She figured out her own personal growth to fix her problem.

What was my personal solution to my own personal problem? Well, other than reading Rachel Hollis books when I’m feeling down, telling myself that I AM enough, that I am good enough at my job, that without me, Interlibrary Loans would be an absolute mess, possibly even halting for a bit, while the new girl figured it out. Telling myself that I’m not in the control room, launching a rocket to outer space. I have wiggle room for mistakes, for this personal growth.

There are so many chapters that I can talk about, this review would take all day to read. As stated before, Rachel has an amazing way of connecting with her readers, maybe because she isn’t afraid to tell them that it’s okay to feel the way you do. It is refreshing to see the real aspect of life, the downs that no one seems to talk about. People struggle, they make mistakes, they don’t reach their highest potential. Rachel wants ALL people, from every walk of life, to learn to love themselves and reach for the highest possibility.

Would I recommend this book?:  If you are out there, with a business, or even just a goal that you would like to achieve, and you are struggling, do yourself a favor and pick up this book. It is EVERYWHERE, at your local library, Target, a bookstore, or Amazon. Read a chapter every night, and laugh and cry with Rachel as she coaches you through the hardships of life.

By the way, if someone has her personal email, do me a favor and send it to me. I need to let her know that I would like to be her best friend because I need that kind of encouragement in my life. 😂


This is a shorter review, but I think it hits the nail. I hope more reviews are coming soon in the near future! I have another one that I’m working on right now for y’all. I’m sorry for all of the delays, life has been crazy. Bear with me as I’m working through this funk!

😊

The Library Lady

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